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Filtering by Tag: The Washington City Paper

Written in the Stars: Constellation Theatre’s "Aida," reviewed.

Chris Klimek

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Because three shows had their press nights here in the DMV the same night Constellation Theatre Company opened their version of the Y2K-era Elton John-Tim Rice musical Aida, myWashington City Paper review took a little while to appear. Here it is. The principal actors are better than most of the material.

Less Is Moor: Othello, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Screen veteran Faran Tahir in  Othello  at The Shakespeare Theatre. (Scott Suchman)

Screen veteran Faran Tahir in Othello at The Shakespeare Theatre. (Scott Suchman)

I reviewed the Shakespeare Theatre Company's new Ron Daniels-directed Othello, starring Jinn's Faran Tahir as the Moor of Venice, for the Washington City PaperJonno Roberts' Iago is the best reason to go.

How You Like Them Apples? Sorry and Regular Singing, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Sarah Marshall, Elizabeth Pierotti, Rick Foucheux, and Kimberly Schraf in The Apple Family Cycle, part the second, at Studio Theatre. (Allie Dearie)

Sarah Marshall, Elizabeth Pierotti, Rick Foucheux, and Kimberly Schraf in The Apple Family Cycle, part the second, at Studio Theatre. (Allie Dearie)

My review of Sorry and Regular Singing, the latter two entries in Richard Nelson's Apple Family quartet, is in today's Washington City Paper. I reviewed the first pair, That Hopey Changey Thing and Sweet and Sad, when the same director and cast staged them here in Washington two years ago; see here. If I've little more to say now than I said then, it's only because the magnificent strengths of the whole are also the strengths of its magnificent component parts.

I've Got You Under My Skin: Silence! The Musical, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Tally Sessions and Laura Jordan as Hannibal Lecter and Clarice Starling in the musical parody  The Silence of the Lambs  demanded .  (Igor Dmitry)

Tally Sessions and Laura Jordan as Hannibal Lecter and Clarice Starling in the musical parody The Silence of the Lambs demanded. (Igor Dmitry)

Studio Theatre served fava beans as snacks on press night of Silence! The Musical. Tasteful! fuhfuhfuhfuhfuhfuhfuh.

review the show in today's Washington City Paper.

Bringing Out the DC Dead

Chris Klimek

The flood of new words from me posting today and tomorrow includes this Washington City Paper feature on DC DeadRex Daugherty and Vaughn Irving's "zombie survival experience" set in the former Fort Fringe at 607 New York Ave. NW, and likely, if not certain, to be that storied old wreck's final show now that the Capital Fringe Festival has officially moved a mile and change east, to the H Street NE corridor.

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Fetch Clay, Make Man and ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps}, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Roscoe Orman and Eddie Ray Jackson as Stephin Fetchit & Muhammad Ali in Fetch Clay, Make Man. (Round House)

My review of Round House Theatre's strong production of Will Power's Fetch Clay, Make Man, a play about the unlikely friendship of Muhammad Ali and Stephin Fetchit, is in today's Washington City PaperI also review Constellation Theatre's update of a century-old Luigi Pirandello play, ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps}.

If you want to see if your eyes are fast enough to catch the "phantom punch" Ali used to put down Sonny Liston in the first round of their 1965 rematch -- the punch that serves as Fetch Clay's MacGuffin -- it's at about 7:20 in this video.

In Arms' Way: Golda's Balcony and Moth, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Tovah Feldshuh as Golda Meir.

I review Golda's Balcony, William Gibson's 2003 solo play about the life of Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir, and the U.S. premiere of Australian playwright Declan Greene's Moth in today's Washington City Paper, available wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away for free. Read all about 'em.

Quiet Act: Synetic's Twelfth Night and Forum's Meena's Dream, reviewed

Chris Klimek

"I have been and always shall be your... twin sibling." Alex Mills as Sebastian and Irina Tsikurishvili as Viola in  Twelfth Night.  (Koko Lanham)

"I have been and always shall be your... twin sibling." Alex Mills as Sebastian and Irina Tsikurishvili as Viola in Twelfth Night. (Koko Lanham)

My reviews of Synetic Theatre's silent, early-cinema-and-Jazz Age-inflected Twelfth Night and Anu Yadav's solo show Meena's Dream are in today's Washington City Paper.