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Filtering by Tag: The Studio Theatre

Depth and Deprivation: "The Children" and "Love's Labor's Lost," reviewed.

Chris Klimek

I didn't write about Ella Hickson's Oil, the best play I've seen this year. But I did review Lucy Kirkwood's The Children, the second-best. I'm struck by how different two plays with ecological themes written by British women born in the 80s that premiered in 2016 can be. I also wrote about Folger's new production of the seldom-staged Shakespeare comedy, Love's Labor's Lost, and discussed it on Around Town, below.

Language Bury Her: Studio's Translations and Folger's The Winter's Tale, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

British soldiers survey an Irish village circa 1830 in  Translations . (Teresa Wood)

British soldiers survey an Irish village circa 1830 in Translations. (Teresa Wood)

I've got reviews of two shows I enjoyed in this week's Washington City Paper: Studio Theatre second-in-command Matt Torney's confident new production of Brian Friel's 40-year-old Irish classic Translations, and Aaron Posner's The Winter's Tale over at the Folger. The former as a lot of superb performers who haven't worked a lot in Washington before. The latter has a bunch of Posner's favorite actors (and mine), but it's Michael Tisdale as the maniacal King Leontes who runs away with the show.

Talking Skeleton Crew and Word Becomes Flesh on WETA's Around Town

Chris Klimek

With the return of theatre season comes the return of me trying semi-convincingly to smile on command! Robert Aubry Davis, Jane Horwitz,and I have shot a new batch of short Around Town segments discussing a great pair of shows I reviewed for the Washington City Paper last monthStudio Theatre’s production of Skeleton Crew byDominique Morisseau and Theatre Alliance’s remount of their Helen Hayes Award-winning 2016 version of Marc Bamuthi Joseph Word Becomes Flesh. How to embed those videos here eludes me because I’m an analog guy, but I’ve got links.

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Wake Up: Studio's Skeleton Crew and Theatre Alliance's Word Becomes Flesh, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Caroline Stefanie Clay and Tyee Tilghman in  Skeleton Crew . (Teresa Wood)

Caroline Stefanie Clay and Tyee Tilghman in Skeleton Crew. (Teresa Wood)

You've got two, two, two big shows written by and starring people of color up in the District just now: Skeleton Crew, the third entry in Dominique Morisseau's Detroit series, has the same concerns as Lynne Nottage's Pulitzer Prize-winning Sweat but it's a better play, and Studio Theatre's production is built to last. And Psalmayene 24's multi Helen Hayes Award-winning production of Marc Bamuthi Joseph's Word Becomes Flesh is back at Theatre Alliance for a remount starring the same superb cast it did last year. I review both in this week's Washington City Paper. For which I also wrote the cover story, for some reason. It's not like I get paid by the word, people.

Sisters of No Mercy: Three Sisters and No Sisters, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Kimberly Gilbert and Todd Scofield in  No Sisters.  (Studio Theatre)

Kimberly Gilbert and Todd Scofield in No Sisters. (Studio Theatre)

Studio Theatre is putting on a ballsy experiment for the next month or so, running a new production of Three Sisters and No SistersAaron Posner's companion play—not in rep but literally on top of one another. I review both in this week's Washington City Paper.

FURTHER READING: My April 2015 review of Round House's Uncle Vanya. My January 2015 review of Posner's Life Sucks, or the Present Ridiculous at Theatre J. My June 2013 review of Stupid Fucking Bird. And my August 2011 review of the Sydney Theatre Company's Uncle Vanya, starring Cate Blanchett and Hugo Weaving.

Visions of Diana: King Charles III and I Wanna Fucking Tear You Apart, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

I'm putting y'all on notice: My reviews of King Charles IIIMike Bartlett's marvelous blank verse political drama at the Shakespeare Theatre—and Studio Theatre's world premiere production of Morgan Gould's I Wanna Fucking Tear You Apart are in this week's Washington City Paper.

Epic-in-the-Brechtian-Sense Failure: Kiss, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Lelia TahaBurt, Shannon Dorsey, Gabriela Fernandez-Coffey, Tim Getman, and Ahmad Kamal in  Kiss . 

Lelia TahaBurt, Shannon Dorsey, Gabriela Fernandez-Coffey, Tim Getman, and Ahmad Kamal in Kiss

Feeling compelled to write a play about war or genocide? You've got your work cut out for you, but God bless. Feel compelled to turn your frustration over how hard it is to write a good play about war or genocide into a play? Please stop. A lot of things are about you, but not everything.

Woolly Mammoth's American premiere of Chilean playwright Guillermo Calderón's Kiss is not as bad as Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present, because nothing I've ever seen on a stage is as myopic and offensive as Jackie Sibblies Drury’s We Are Proud to Present. But it ain't good. I break it down in today's Washington City Paper, available wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away gratis.