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Filtering by Tag: Shakespeare Theatre Company

Intimate Apparel: STC's "The Panties, the Profit, and The Partner," reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Kevin Isola takes a liberty with Kimberly Gilbert in  The Panties.  (Carol Rosegg)

Kevin Isola takes a liberty with Kimberly Gilbert in The Panties. (Carol Rosegg)

For your Washington City Paper, I reviewed The Panties, the Profit, and the Purse—a series of linked David Ives comedies adapted, with shrinking fidelity, from a trilogy by the 19th century German social critic Carl Sternheim. That sounds awfully highbrow, doesn't it? Ives is better at farce than at satire, and the show is a better document of what he likes than what he thinks. I liked it, but I'd like it more if Ives would—in the words of the 21st century social critic Boots Riley—"Sho[his]Ass." As it were.

Merciless Flight: STC's Twelfth Night, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Hannah Yelland and Paul Deo, Jr. as Olivia and Sebastian (Scott Suchman)

Hannah Yelland and Paul Deo, Jr. as Olivia and Sebastian (Scott Suchman)

Twelfth Night is my favorite Shakespeare play. The Shakespeare Theatre Company's Ethan McSweeny-directed production is cleverly staged on a set made to resemble an airport, but it left me cold. In my Washington City Paper review, I try to unpack why.

Visions of Diana: King Charles III and I Wanna Fucking Tear You Apart, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

I'm putting y'all on notice: My reviews of King Charles IIIMike Bartlett's marvelous blank verse political drama at the Shakespeare Theatre—and Studio Theatre's world premiere production of Morgan Gould's I Wanna Fucking Tear You Apart are in this week's Washington City Paper.

The Man Trap: STC's The Taming of the Shrew and Mosaic Theatre's When January Feels Like Summer, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Directors have reckoned with the misogyny of The Taming of the Shrew in many ways. Ed Sylvanus Iskandar's fix — cast only men, and let the female characters express themselves via covers of old songs from Duncan Sheik, a man — is at least, and most, strange. I review Iskandar's perplexing boys-only Shakespeare Theatre Company Shrew in today's Washington City Paper.

Also reviewed: Mosaic Theatre of DC's When January Feels Like Summer, a shaky play featuring a rock-steady cast. Jeremy Keith Hunter apparently had a small role in Studio Theatre's Chimerica, a show I loved last year, but I don't remember him from that. He's brilliant in January, though.

Totalitarian Recall: 1984 and The Pillowman, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Jim Jorgensen, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh, and Bradley Foster Smith in  The Pillowman  (Forum).

Jim Jorgensen, Maboud Ebrahimzadeh, and Bradley Foster Smith in The Pillowman (Forum).

My reviews of the British theatre collective Headlong's adaptation of George Orwell's 1984, and Forum Theatre's new staging of Martin McDonagh's The Pillowman, are in today's Washington City Paper.

Here's the trailer the 1984 Michael Radford's version of 1984 that I mention I saw at an impressionable age. I can't imagine ever saying this in any other context, but the Eurythmics soundtrack was not a good idea.

Less Is Moor: Othello, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Screen veteran Faran Tahir in  Othello  at The Shakespeare Theatre. (Scott Suchman)

Screen veteran Faran Tahir in Othello at The Shakespeare Theatre. (Scott Suchman)

I reviewed the Shakespeare Theatre Company's new Ron Daniels-directed Othello, starring Jinn's Faran Tahir as the Moor of Venice, for the Washington City PaperJonno Roberts' Iago is the best reason to go.

Heal Thyself: The Critic and The Real Inspector Hound, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

The cast of  The Real Inspector Hound  (Scott Suchman/Shakespeare Theatre Co.)

The cast of The Real Inspector Hound (Scott Suchman/Shakespeare Theatre Co.)

I couldn't make the Monday-night press premiere of Shakespeare Theatre Company's twofer of Richard Brinsley Sheridan's The Critic and Tom Stoppard's The Real Inspector Hound last week, as I am teaching the Sweet Science on Monday nights this season. But I caught up with the show later in the week and my Washington City Paper review went up this afternoon. Stoppard's play, especially, makes the pain of hackery burn more than usual.

The Prince of Wails: Henry IV, Part 1 and Part 2, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. Edward Gero in Henry IV, Part 1.

That's Edward Gero as King Henry IV. I found out only the other day he was in Die Hard 2: Die Harder, a film I loved in 1990 but which has not aged as well as Die Hard or even Die Hard with a Vengeance. I probably didn't talk about him enough in my tangled but enthusiastic Washington City Paper review of both parts of the Shakespeare Theatre's Company's new, Michael Kahn-directed repertory of Henry IV, Part 1 and Part 2.

The Chimes at Midnight, Orson Welles' 1965 compression of the Henriad, which I probably spent too much real estate on in the review, is officially, criminally out-of-print, but you can watch it in its entirety for the time being on YouTube. Do.