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SWAGGER, NOT STYLE

The worldwide headquarters and hindquarters of freelance writer Chris Klimek

This Song Is Not a Rebel Song; This Song Is "Sunday Bloody Sunday," 14 Years Later

Chris Klimek

(And now another dozen years beyond that.) U2, the oldest (well, longest-standing), sacredest of my sacred cows, will release No Line on the Horizon, their 12th studio album, on March 3, and you'll be able to spend as much money as you want on the thing. (A pay-what-you-will, just-the-music download edition a la Radiohead would be the decent, tasteful thing for U2 to do -- they can easily afford it -- but it ain't gonna happen.)

I've long believed U2 to be superstitious about the months in which they drop albums, and their long-awaited latest was originally rumored to be a November release -- like 1991's Achtung Baby, 2000's All That You Can't Leave Behind (which actually came out on Halloween, as I recall, which is almost November), and 2004's How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb.

The Joshua Tree, still U2's most beloved and iconic album despite strong competition from Achtung, was a March release, way back in 1987. But the new record will be U2's first March record since -- gasp! -- 1997's POP.

Am I going to re-open the debate about U2's most controversial album? Hell, no. (But if you feel like delving into that, you can stop by Carrie Brownstein's superb Monitor Mix blog, where she recently suggested that POP and the subsequent PopMart Tour -- which I saw four times! -- might stand as a textbook case of shark-jumpery.) I just hope No Line on the Horizon isn't an overhyped, undercooked, and yet still ultimately underrated album that we're all still fighting about in 2021. That seems to have been POP 's fate, though it still gets revived and defended in unlikely places by unlikely people. The Imposter, for example. His cover might be the definitive version of "Please."

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAgY7UFl6wk&hl=en&fs=1]

That U2 played "Sunday Bloody Sunday" every night on their last two tours after having rendered the 1983 song all but obsolete with "Please" in 1997 is just straight-up pandering, Man. At least play both!