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SWAGGER, NOT STYLE

The worldwide headquarters and hindquarters of freelance writer Chris Klimek

Recentlies

Chris Klimek

Right, so clearly I left the store unattended while I was working on my little Xmas-musiq project over the last little while. But just because I haven't posting things here doesn't mean I haven't been writing at my usual, punishing clip. Some reviews I forgot to post:

For the Washington City Paper: It isn't Keegan Theatre's fault that Clifford Odets's Golden Boy is such a goofy play -- not dated, just complete bunk -- but they could, and should, have helped out their lead actor by teaching him just enough fiddling and boxing to fake the few seconds of each he's called upon to deliver onstage convincingly. Then again, that "few seconds" thing is a big part of why I couldn't get wrapped up in the story enough to forgive its dumb premise. For the drama to work, we need to believe that the violin is important to Joe, the protagonist of the piece. We need to see that it's not merely his dad's ambition for him to become a musician; that it's a role in which he imagines himself, too. That element is completely absent from this production. If we actually saw him perform a single piece on the violin, alone, for his own pleasure -- one scene, no dialogue -- that might change things.

In any case, John Robert Keena is welcome in my boxing class whenever we wants to stop by. (I can't help him with the violin.) One the commenters on the review judged it "rather nasty"; I hope it wasn't.

For the Washington Post: The Walkmen played an unsenitmental homecoming show of sorts at the 9:30 Club. They're the real thing.

For the Washington City Paper, again: Studio's production of Jez Butterworth's MOJO is a great time despite one little arachnid-themed anachronism.

For the Washington Post, again: I finally got to see Jeff Tweedy play solo.

And for -- this is a new one -- the Dallas Morning News, I reviewed Michael Schumacher's new biography of the pioneering cartoonist, Will Eisner: A Dreamer's Life in Comics.

Go on, read. It's fundamental.