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Latest Work

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You Got to Have a Mother Box For Me: Justice League, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

How Green Was My Screen: JK Simmons, Gal Gadot, Ray Fisher, Ben Affleck, and Ezra Miller (Warner Bros.).

How Green Was My Screen: JK Simmons, Gal Gadot, Ray Fisher, Ben Affleck, and Ezra Miller (Warner Bros.).

Early in Justice League, while director Zack Snyder abuses yet another Leonard Cohen song, we see a glimpse of a Metropolis Post front page with a headline about vanished heroes that puts Kal-El in the middle of a triptych with Prince and David Bowie. It feels like a joke from Men in Black (another comic book-derived movie) 20 years ago. Anyway, it's good to see that Metropolis is still a two-paper town.

Here's my review of Justice League, where I did not really have room to complain that J.K. Simmons, the J. Jonah Jameson of Sam Raimi's no-longer-canonical Spider-Man trilogy, is now Commissioner Gordon, which feels like double-dipping, or that Gordon has once again been demoted to empty trenchcoat after being a vibrant, fully-developed character in Christopher Nolan's no-longer-canonical Dark Knight trilogy. These movies, man.

Apprentice v Apprentice: Vicuña & The American Epilogue, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

John de Lancie, Brian George, and Haaz Sleiman (Mosaic Theatre)

John de Lancie, Brian George, and Haaz Sleiman (Mosaic Theatre)

My Washington City Paper review of Jon Robin Baitz's already-anachronistic Trump satire Vicuña, which is getting a lavish second production at Mosaic Theatre after premiering in Los Angeles last year, is here.

Fargo Fuck Yourself: Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Woody Harrelson and Frances McDormand in writer/director Martin McDonagh's finest film.

Woody Harrelson and Frances McDormand in writer/director Martin McDonagh's finest film.

Up until now, Martin McDonagh's best plays and movies have all been set in rural Ireland, or in an unnamed fictional totalitarian state, or In Bruges. That changes with the superb Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri, his first U.S.-set story that doesn't feel like the work of a tourist. Here's my NPR review.

Ragna-roll With It: Thor: Ragnarok, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

It's way more fun than this photo would suggest. (Disney/Marvel)

It's way more fun than this photo would suggest. (Disney/Marvel)

Thor: Ragnarok is the best Thor movie by an Asgardian mile, but don't let that backhanded compliment keep you away. With dual villains played by Cate Blanchett and Jeff Goldblum plus a Mark Mothersbaugh score, it's a stealth The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou reunion. Lo, here's my NPR review.

My Lazenby Moment: I'm on today's episode of James Bonding!

Chris Klimek

I've wanted to be a guest on James Bonding, the podcast hosted by 007 "lovers, not experts" Matt Gourley and Matt Mira, since the first episode appeared four years ago. (The topic was Dr. No, 007 No. 001, and the guest was Paul F. Thompkins.) I've plugged the show on Pop Culture Happy Hour and on Filmspotting. I owe Gourley and Mira a debt of gratitude for getting my girlfriend interested in watching Bond movies by poking fun at them in the loving way that only a true fan can. Beyond that, I've been a huge admirer of Gourley's work on his other podcasts, I Was There Too and Superego.

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Film Blanc: Suburbicon, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Julianne Moore and Oscar Isaac exchange unpleasantries. (Paramount)

Julianne Moore and Oscar Isaac exchange unpleasantries. (Paramount)

I'm an admirer of all the principals involved, so it brings me no joy to report to you that Suburbicon—cowriter/director George Clooney's deeply misguided retread of a Coen Bros. script from 30 years agois the biggest embarrassment to Hollywood's liberal piety since Crash. At least Oscar Issac is having a good time.

We Need to Talk About Keoghan: The Killing of a Sacred Deer, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Colin Farrell and Barry Keoghan in Yorgos Lanthimos' latest puzzler.

Colin Farrell and Barry Keoghan in Yorgos Lanthimos' latest puzzler.

Writing a review the same day I see a film or a play will never be my favorite way to work, but the results aren't always bad. It's trickier when the subject is as provocative and original as Yorgos Lanthimos' movies tend to be. His latest, a mix of Greek myth and The Shining-era Stantley Kubrick, is well worth seeing even if it's not quite as strong as The Lobster. 

Rome, If You Want To: Folger’s Antony and Cleopatra, reviewed.

Chris Klimek

Robbie Gay, Cody Nickell, Nigel Gore, Chris Genebach, and Anthony Michael Martinez as Roman soldiers. (Teresa Wood)

Robbie Gay, Cody Nickell, Nigel Gore, Chris Genebach, and Anthony Michael Martinez as Roman soldiers. (Teresa Wood)

My Shakespeare professor at James Madison University, Ralph Cohen, told us Antony and Cleopatra was his favorite Shakespeare play. Robert Richmond's new production for the Folger Theatre, with Cody Nickell and Shirine Babb in the title roles, took me back to my salad days. I reviewed the show in this week's Washington City Paper. Individual issues are free but the paper is currently for sale. It's all very confusing.